PHOTOBLOG: WILDLIFE IN THE WESTERN GHATS

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This flycatcher liked to hang out in the open-air dining hall.
Termite mound.
Termite mound.
A type of civet called a toddy cat.  He was perched in a tree near our cottage.  He's not much bigger than a housecat.
A type of civet called a toddy cat. He was perched in a tree near our cottage. He’s not much bigger than a housecat.
Green vine snake.
Green vine snake.
Gecko on a night hike.
Gecko on a night hike.
Frog on a night hike.  We didn't have a field guide to amphibians, so we couldn't ID what we saw.
Frog on a night hike. We didn’t have a field guide to amphibians, so we couldn’t ID what we saw.

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And now for some other people’s photos, because my wildlife photography leaves room for improvement.

The Hermitage has a camera trap set at the front gate to the property.  This image of a leopard was taken the night before our arrival.  Katrina believes the leopard is a male, based on his size and movements.  He's been spotted (!!!) on their property on a monthly basis since last fall.  This is very exciting.  I've decided to name him Leopold.
The Hermitage has a camera trap set at the front gate to the property. This image of a leopard was taken the night before our arrival. Katrina believes the leopard is a male, based on his size and movements. He’s been spotted (!!!) on their property on a monthly basis since last fall. This is very big deal! I’ve decided to name him Leopold.
A clearer picture of the leopard from last fall.
A clearer picture of the same leopard from last fall.
Malabar giant squirrel.  The tail alone is about 2ft long.  (Image by Joseph Lazer.)
Malabar giant squirrel. The tail alone is about 2ft long. These are quite common here.  (Creative Commons image by Joseph Lazer.)
Langur monkeys would swing by the Hermitage's main hall every afternoon.
Langur monkeys would swing by the Hermitage’s main hall every afternoon. (Creative Commons photo by Manoj Nair.)
Gray slender loris.  We tried and tried to find one of these guys at night, but no luck.  (Creative Commons photo by Kalyan Varma.)
Gray slender loris. We tried and tried to find one of these guys at night, but no luck. (Creative Commons photo by Kalyan Varma.)
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4 thoughts on “PHOTOBLOG: WILDLIFE IN THE WESTERN GHATS”

  1. Hi, Jay and I were wondering when you guys will be in China? I am going to make a plan to go back to China play with Simon…

  2. Thanks Sharon! We escaped with all limbs intact and never saw Leopold. Once on a night hike, we heard a loud growl in the not-so-distant woods. “Is it dangerous?,” I asked Katrina.
    “I hope not,” she said.
    “Let’s stick to the open road,” said her father. And so we did.

  3. Hi Joy! We are actually arriving in Hong Kong in the morning, February 3. We don’t know exactly how long we will be there, but certainly into June. We would love to see you!

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